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Investing in Discovery

An Overview of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences

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The Dance of Life

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Photo Credits

Actin (red), microtubules (green) and DNA in cell nucleus (cyan) revealed through multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Credit: Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University of California, San DiegoActin (red), microtubules (green) and DNA in cell nucleus (cyan) revealed through multiphoton fluorescence microscopy. Credit: Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University of California, San Diego

Microtubules (green) and clathrin-coated pits (red) taken with stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. Credit: Xiaowei Zhuang, Harvard UniversityMicrotubules (green) and clathrin-coated pits (red) taken with stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. Credit: Xiaowei Zhuang, Harvard University

The 46 human chromosomes in blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Credit: Hased Padilla-Nash and Thomas Reid, National Cancer InstituteThe 46 human chromosomes in blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Credit: Hased Padilla-Nash and Thomas Reid, National Cancer Institute

Cell movement, revealed with fluorescent dyes. Credit: K. Donais and Donna Webb, University of Virginia School of MedicineCell movement, revealed with fluorescent dyes. Credit: K. Donais and Donna Webb, University of Virginia School of Medicine

Computational model of the Golgi. Credit: Kathryn Howell, University of ColoradoComputational model of the Golgi. Credit: Kathryn Howell, University of Colorado

Computer-generated model of a G protein. Credit: Protein Data BankComputer-generated model of a G protein. Credit: Protein Data Bank

Fluorescently labeled cells revealing where medicines and chemicals accumulate. Credit: Gus Rosania, University of MichiganFluorescently labeled cells revealing where medicines and chemicals accumulate. Credit: Gus Rosania, University of Michigan

Chromosomes (red) and microtubules (green) during cell division, highlighted with fluorescent dyes. Credit: Edward Salmon, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillChromosomes (red) and microtubules (green) during cell division, highlighted with fluorescent dyes. Credit: Edward Salmon, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Tubulin (green) accumulating in cell nucleus (outlined in pink) as the cell ages. Credit: Maximiliano D'Angelo and Martin Hetzer, Salk InstituteTubulin (green) accumulating in cell nucleus (outlined in pink) as the cell ages. Credit: Maximiliano D'Angelo and Martin Hetzer, Salk Institute

NMR readout of an enzyme as it changes shape. Credit: Dorothee Kern, Brandeis UniversityNMR readout of an enzyme as it changes shape. Credit: Dorothee Kern, Brandeis University

Blood vessels on the surface of a mouse brain, imaged by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Credit: Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University of California, San DiegoBlood vessels on the surface of a mouse brain, imaged by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Credit: Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University of California, San Diego

A network diagram showing a yeast cell's protein-protein interactions. Credit: Hawoong Jeong, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and TechnologyA network diagram showing a yeast cell's protein-protein interactions. Credit: Hawoong Jeong, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

Human epithelial cells stained with quantum dots to reveal their nuclei (blue), nuclear proteins (magenta), mitochondria (orange), microtubules (green) and actin filaments (red). Credit: Quantum Dot Corporation, Hayward, CaliforniaHuman epithelial cells stained with quantum dots to reveal their nuclei (blue), nuclear proteins (magenta), mitochondria (orange), microtubules (green) and actin filaments (red). Credit: Quantum Dot Corporation, Hayward, California

A microarray of genetic data. Credit: Gene Expression Omnibus, National Center for Biotechnology InformationA microarray of genetic data. Credit: Gene Expression Omnibus, National Center for Biotechnology Information

This page last reviewed on September 18, 2012