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Contacts by Research Area

NIGMS supports basic biomedical research that contributes to the understanding of fundamental cellular and physiological principles. General areas of interest include cell biology, biophysics, genetics, developmental biology, pharmacology, physiology, biological chemistry, biomedical technology, bioinformatics and computational biology. The material below provides details on these areas.

View the entire list of program descriptions and contacts.

Biophysics, Biomedical Technology, and Computational Biosciences

Genetics and Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry

Research Capacity Building

Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity


Biophysics, Biomedical Technology, and Computational Biosciences

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Modeling

Bioinformatics applications in the general area of complex biological systems to create or maintain databases; develop or use methods to manage, visualize, and analyze data in these databases; or use methods commonly associated with bioinformatics to deduce information about biological systems. Computational biology applications should develop new approaches, algorithms, and methods for an integrative understanding of biomedical systems and could span temporal and spatial domains. Of interest are development of computational algorithms and tools, modeling techniques and approaches for understanding the complexity of biological systems. The scope of the systems covered ranges from cellular to tissue, organ, systems studies, and up to populational dynamics. This includes gene, protein and metabolic networks, cellular architecture and intracellular dynamics, cell communication and motility, cell division and differentiation, tissue formation and organogenesis, tissue and organ functions, changes in population characteristics as a consequence of interaction of organisms with their physical environment, with individuals of their own species, and with organisms of other species.

Paul Brazhnik, Ph.D. (Bioinformatics and Computational Biology)
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: brazhnikp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Veerasamy Ravichandran (Bioinformatics and Modeling)
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: veerasamy.ravichandran@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Haluk Resat, Ph.D. (Modeling)
Tel: 301-827-6671
E-mail: haluk.resat@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biostatistics

Biostatics areas of interest include development of advanced statistical techniques and methodologies for design of biological experiments, collection and analysis of the data from those experiments and interpretation of, and inference from, the results. The scope of studies ranges from those focused-on sequencing, mass spectrometry, bioimaging and other high-through-put techniques in data to medicine, pharmacology, and populational studies.

Paul Brazhnik, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: brazhnikp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Centers -- Complex Biological Systems Related to Trauma and Burn

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biomedical Technology

Bioanalytical Technologies

Development of new or improved instruments, methods, and related software for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of biomedically relevant molecules, including biopolymers, metabolites, and macromolecular complexes. Relevant technologies and methods include sample handling, separations, mass spectrometry, microarrays, nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, radionuclides and stable isotopes, optical and vibrational spectroscopy, flow-based systems, and computational tools for data interpretation, curation, and mining. Bioanalytical technology development also includes hardware, software, and methods for the identification and analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and other metabolites, proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics.

Ward Smith, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-443-9375
E-mail: smithwar@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biomedical Technology Research Resources (BTRRs)

These resources create critical, often unique technology and methods at the forefront of their respective fields and apply them to a broad range of basic, translational, and clinical research. This occurs through a synergistic interaction of technical and biomedical expertise, both within the centers and in intensive collaborations with other leading laboratories.

Mary Ann Wu, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: maryann.wu@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Technologies for Imaging and Manipulating Cells

Areas of interest include new or improved tools and methods to directly manipulate or investigate cells and their environment. Includes methods for delivery of molecules and nanoparticles into cells, transport between cellular compartments, and in situ imaging from organelles to cells.

Paul Sammak, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: paul.sammak@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Technologies for Structural Biology

Development of new or improved instruments, methods, and related software for the elucidation of 3D structures of macromolecules and macromolecular complexes. Relevant technologies cover areas of sample handling; x-ray diffraction; other x-ray techniques; magnetic resonance such as NMR, EPR and ESR; microscopic techniques that resolve at the molecular level, such as single particle cryo-electron microscopy. Computational tools for data collection, processing, interpretation, curation, and mining.

Mary Ann Wu, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: maryann.wu@nih.gov
Biographical sketch


Biophysics

Biophysical Studies of Supramolecular Complexes

Research on the mechanisms of assembly, structure, and function of cellular ultra structures larger than a few million Daltons and dependent on high levels of molecular organization. These include large cellular machines such as the ribosome, spliceosome, cytoskeletal structures, interactions between intracellular and extracellular matrix components, signaling networks that depend on large scale interactions, when studied primarily by multiple methods and/or by methods that are not routine, such as single particle cryo-electron microscopy, cryo-electron tomography, scanning probe microscopy and other force transduction methods.

Paula Flicker, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: flickerp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biophysical Studies of the Viral Life Cycle

Research involving the application of physical principles to the study of viral attachment, fusion/penetration, uncoating, assembly, and budding/release. Areas of research include: analysis of virus-host interactions; phage and viral packaging; the structure and mechanism of assemblies from viral and host components; and the determination of factors and energetics that regulate protein-nucleic acid interactions necessary for virion entry, packaging, maturation, and release.

Michael Sakalian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: sakalianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biophysical Studies Related to HIV/AIDS

Interdisciplinary research involving structural biologists, synthetic organic chemists, theoreticians and virologists to elucidate the structures of HIV virus related molecules and host cell components that are essential to the viral life cycle HIV, and to apply this information to the development of anti-AIDS drugs using structure-based drug design.

Michael Sakalian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: sakalianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biophysics of Membranes and Membrane Proteins

General principles of membrane structure and function including behavior of lipids, bilayers, and other lipid phases; membrane protein structure and function, including folding, assembly, dynamics, and general mechanisms of action, conformational changes and energy coupling; membrane protein-lipid interactions, effects of lipid compositions and phase separated domains; physical studies of fusion, fission, and deformation processes; as studied through the application of primarily biophysical methods and approaches.

Peter C. Preusch, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: preuschp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biophysics of Nucleic Acids and Nucleoprotein Complexes

Research involving the application of physical principles to the study of nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes. Areas of research include: physical and chemical studies of nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes; analysis of protein-nucleic acid interactions and assembly mechanisms; ligand-nucleic acid interactions; development of physical, chemical, and theoretical/computational techniques for the analysis of nucleic acids and their complexes.

Peter C. Preusch, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: preuschp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biophysics of Proteins – Folding, Interactions, Structure/Dynamics, Mechanisms

Biophysical studies of all aspects of protein structure and function in which the goal is to elucidate general principles, primarily by experimental methods, but may involve established computational methods and/or confirmatory in vivo studies. Included are studies that establish the physical and thermodynamic basis for native structure; protein-protein interactions, and protein-ligand recognition; protein de novo design and engineering. Experimental studies of protein folding; protein folding mechanisms and kinetics. Experimental studies of intrinsically disordered proteins; folding upon binding, protein aggregation, and phase separations. The role of structural dynamics in protein function, folding, and allosteric control.

Janna Wehrle, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: wehrlej@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Molecular Modeling, Theory, and Design

Includes theoretical, computational, and physics-based studies of the fundamental behaviors of atoms to molecules and their interactions. This would include predominantly theoretical and computational studies in the following areas: quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics simulations; thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; basic principles of molecular recognition, development and validation of force fields and scoring functions, and algorithms for prediction of molecular properties; macromolecule-ligand binding predictions by docking and other in silico screening methods applicable to drug design; predictions of protein and other macromolecular structures; and studies in macromolecular design, protein folding, RNA folding, molecular interactions, membrane and membrane protein simulations, phase separations, aggregation, and complex formation.

Peter Lyster, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6445
E-mail: lysterpe@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Janna Wehrle, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: wehrlej@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

SBIR/STTR Program for BBCB

This portfolio comprises SBIR/STTR projects of general interest to the Division of Biophysics, Biomedical Technology, and Computational Biosciences. These projects are notable for their general pertinence to basic science issues and broad applicability of the proposed developments.

Dmitriy Krepkiy, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-435-0752
E-mail: krepkiyd@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch


Genetics and Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

Cell Biology

Cell Division

Mitosis and meiosis, spindle functions, structure, assembly, mechanisms, and mechanics, regulation of kinetochore functions, spindle assembly check points, chromosome attachment and movement.

James F. Deatherage, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: deatherj@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Cell Migration and Adhesion

Chemotaxis, gradient sensing in motility. Bacterial chemotaxis, flagellar motor. Junctions, focal adhesions, Extracellular matrix (ECM). Integrins, cadherins and cell cortex in adhesion signaling that controls migration.

James F. Deatherage, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: deatherj@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Cell Organization and Mechanics

Establishment of cellular polarity, e.g. epithelial topogenesis, yeast bud site selection, leading edge, filopodia, and other protrusions. Bacterial flagella, pili, organelles. Positioning of organelles and other components in cells. Mechanotransduction, cellular mechanics, force production, cell shape changes, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, other morphogenetic processes.

James F. Deatherage, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: deatherj@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Endocytosis, Lysosomes, Related Organelles

Membrane and protein recycling, endocytosis. Function and biogenesis of endosomes, lysosomes, and lysosome-related organelles. Membrane dynamics in related or interacting processes, including autophagy. Membrane dynamics of processes using endocytic/lysosomal related-machinery, membrane remodeling, scission, and related processes.

Stefan Maas, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: maassw@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Membrane Biology and Organelle Biogenesis

Nuclear envelope, mitochondria, chloroplasts, vacuoles, lipid droplets, other organelles and organelle interactions. Organelle biogenesis, inheritance. Nuclear import and export, nuclear envelope, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport, mRNA localization and targeting. Membrane biogenesis, protein targeting, and anchoring, plasma membrane, membranes in cell-wall biogenesis, sporulation.

Paula Flicker, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: flickerp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Motors, Filaments, and Transport

Cytoskeletal filaments and their interactions with molecular motors. Dynamics and control of the assembly, disassembly and association of cytoskeletal filaments and systems. Structure and function of cytoskeletal proteins. Motor cargo interactions, intracellular transport. Cilia, flagella, primary cilia, centrosomes, centrioles.

Joe Gindhart, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: gindhartjg@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Protein Folding and Degradation

Protein folding and degradation in cellular physiology. Chaperones, proteosomes, protein degradation, cellular roles of ubiquitin. Unfolded protein response and other stress responses. Cellular responses and management of misfolded proteins, abnormal protein folding, pathological responses.

Joe Gindhart, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: gindhartjg@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Protein Processing and Export, Golgi, and ER

Protein processing and trafficking for export, secretion, Golgi and ER functions and biogenesis. Bacterial DNA and protein export. Membrane dynamics of processes using Golgi/ER-related-machinery, including membrane fusion.

Paula Flicker, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: flickerp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch


Developmental and Cellular Processes

Cell Cycle

Control of cell cycle progression: areas include genetic and molecular regulation and function of cell cycle checkpoints and components of the cell cycle, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), inhibitors, activators and tumor suppressors; synthesis, post-translational modification and degradation of the cell cycle machinery, including ubiquitination and sumoylation; temporal and spatial regulation of the cell cycle.

Amanda Melillo, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: amanda.melillo@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Cell Death, Autophagy and Homeostasis

Focuses on the regulation of cellular homeostasis, autophagy and cell death pathways. Emphasis is on principles determining intracellular signaling pathway dynamics and network organization. Areas include metabolic and protein homeostasis, induction and regulation of macroautophagy, programmed cell death, apoptosis and alternative cell death pathways.

Stefan Maas, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: maassw@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Cell Growth and Differentiation

Focuses on cellular decision processes, e.g., growth initiation, proliferation, cell senescence, terminal differentiation, sporulation and chemotaxis regulation. Emphasis is on principles determining intracellular signaling pathway dynamics and network organization. Approaches may include genomics, proteomics or computational modeling, where such models are focused on signaling networks.

Amanda Melillo, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: amanda.melillo@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Chromosome and Nuclear Structures

The principal areas of focus are higher order chromosome architecture, telomeres, centromeres, specialized nuclear substructures, boundary elements, long distance regulators, and spatial organization of genes. Research topics include: structure/function of telomerase, maintenance of telomere length, noncoding RNA effects on telomerase, centromere structure and identity, centromere assembly, and large scale programmed genome rearrangements.

Alexandra Ainsztein, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: ainsztea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Chromosomes and Epigenetics

Identification and characterization of structural and functional components of gene activation and repression. Areas include structure and function of chromatin and large protein-DNA complexes, including interactions of DNA with nonhistone proteins; epigenetic factors influencing gene expression such as histone modifications, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, heterochromatin formation, position effects, imprinting, X-inactivation, gene silencing.

Anthony Carter, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: cartera@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Developmental Genetics

Regulation of early development in multicellular organisms, with an emphasis on non-mammalian systems. Areas include but are not limited to: genetic and molecular regulation of embryonic pattern formation, tissue induction, cell fate determination, and cell and tissue polarity; spatial and temporal localization of developmental determinants; regulation of cell movements in embryogenesis, including early morphogenesis (including biophysical/biomechanical forces); gene regulatory networks controlling developmental pathways; sex determination.

Tanya Hoodbhoy, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: tanyah@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Developmental Signaling

Investigations whose major emphasis is on understanding signaling pathways underlying fundamental processes that drive early (pre-organogenesis) development, primarily using non-mammalian systems. Research should be predominantly focused on the signaling cascades involved in developmental patterning and morphogenetic events rather than on gene regulatory networks or biophysical/biomechanical and cell-level mechanisms. Topics include but are not limited to growth factor/morphogen signaling networks, planar cell polarity signaling, cytoneme/airineme-based signaling, and signaling during collective cell migration.

Tanya Hoodbhoy, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: tanyah@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Dynamic and Stochastic Aspects of Organismal Physiology

Investigations into the regulation and evolution of pathways that control expression of protective genes in response to growth-limiting environmental stressors (such as antibiotics, oxygen levels, temperature, pH, light, gravity, parasitism, toxins and metal ions). Analyses range from molecular, chemical and structural analysis to theoretical model development.

Michael Reddy, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: reddymk@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Genetics

Ethical, legal and social issues in genetics, especially as they relate to the use of stored human tissues for research and to studies on ethnically identifiable populations.

Donna Krasnewich, M.D., Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: dkras@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Microbiome, Biofilms, And Quorum Sensing

Studies of the genetic, physiological and ecological mechanisms governing interchanges between dissimilar organisms, such as commensal, mutualistic, parasitic and symbiotic relationships. The manner by which the microbiota, including biofilms, respond - either at the community, population, organismal or molecular level - to maintain homeostasis or respond to dysbiosis of the host.

Alexandra Ainsztein, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-534-0943
E-mail: ainsztea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Neurogenetics and the Genetics of Behavior

Genetic, molecular and/or genomic characterization of simple and complex behaviors in nonhuman model systems, where the focus is on neural function rather than neural development. Genetic, molecular and/or genomic characterization of circadian rhythms, sleep and related phenomena in nonhuman systems, with an emphasis on invertebrates, plants, fungi and bacteria.

Michael Sesma, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Stem Cell Biology and Regeneration

Studies on the fundamental properties of adult, germline and embryonic stem cells and on the regulation of tissue and organ regeneration. Stem cell areas include: molecular, cellular, genetic and epigenetic properties of stem cells; nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS); signaling pathways in stem cell differentiation; role of stem cell niches and microenvironments in stem cell differentiation; germ cell formation and development. Regeneration areas include genetic, molecular and/or genomic regulation of tissue and organ regeneration in nonhuman model systems, including plants.

Kenneth Gibbs, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3901
E-mail: kenneth.gibbs@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Desirée Salazar, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: desiree.salazar@nih.gov
Biographical sketch


Genetic Mechanisms

DNA Repair and Mutagenesis

Enzymes and mechanisms of DNA repair; mechanisms of action of mutagens and carcinogens; genetics and biochemistry of mutation; interactions of mutagens with nucleic acids.

Kristine Willis, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: kristine.willis@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

DNA Replication

Enzymes and mechanisms of DNA and RNA replication; chromatin regulation of DNA replication; genetics of meiosis; role of recombination in replication; and evolutionary analyses of replication pathways.

Michael Reddy, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: reddymk@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Genetic Basis of Human Biology

Investigations of genetic mechanisms in humans that determine phenotypes evaluated at the molecular, biochemical, cellular or clinical level; genetic studies employing eukaryotic model organisms relevant to a human genetic disorder or phenotype; genetic and environmental factors that influence common disorders with complex inheritance; computational and statistical approaches to the analysis of genetic variation influencing human phenotypes; development of genetic and genomic techniques specific to investigations of human material.

Donna Krasnewich, M.D., Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: dkras@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

mRNA Metabolism and Translational Control

Structure, function and metabolism of cytoplasmic mRNA. Control of gene expression at the level of translation, including RNA editing, mRNA stability, and nonsense-mediated decay.

Michael Bender, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: mbender@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Population Genetics and Evolution

Genetics of natural and laboratory populations; analysis of genetic variation in complex traits in humans and model organisms; evolutionary principles of living systems, including chromosome evolution, phenotypic evolution and speciation; evolution of development; co-adapting systems such as host-pathogen evolution; statistical methods and mathematical models for evolutionary and population genetic analysis.

Daniel Janes, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: janesde@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Protein Synthesis

Protein synthesis as a process, including initiation, elongation and termination; synthesis, structure and function of all biochemical components of the translation system, namely tRNA, rRNA, ribosomal proteins and initiation and termination factors.

Darren Sledjeski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: darren.sledjeski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Anissa J. Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: anissa.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Regulatory RNAs

Mechanisms of production and regulation of regulatory RNAs including siRNAs, microRNAs, piRNAs, CRISPR RNAs and related non-coding RNAs. Function of regulatory RNA including effects on mRNA stability or translation.

Michael Bender, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: mbender@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

RNA Processing

Splicing of all species of RNA following completion of transcription and prior to translational events in the cytoplasm; processing of RNA, including methylation, capping and polyadenylation; mechanism and regulation of alternative splicing and trans-splicing; formation, structure, function and regulation of spliceosomal precursors and components; mechanism and regulation of self-splicing; intranuclear transport of RNA.

Michael Bender, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: mbender@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Transcription Mechanisms

Genetic, biochemical, biophysical and structural characterization of the macromolecular interactions that mediate DNA-dependent RNA transcription; genomics- and expression-based strategies for identifying, on a global basis, molecules and sequences involved in regulating transcription; development of reagents and techniques for visualizing or manipulating transcription.

Darren Sledjeski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: darren.sledjeski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch


Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry

Biochemistry and Bio-related Chemistry

Bioenergetics and Mitochondria

Energy transducing enzymes of the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, chloroplasts, and microorganisms; electron transport, photosynthesis, including biogenesis of cofactors and substrate transport.

Vernon Anderson, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: andersonve@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biotechnology and Bioengineering

Biochemical tools (e.g., engineered DNA, RNA, protein, peptides or biomimetics), and processes derived from living cells or their components.  Includes engineering technologies to produce useful biological materials.

Miles A. Fabian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: fabianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Chemical Biology and Molecular Assemblies

Discovery and design of molecular probes, polymers, molecular assemblies, and nanostructured materials as mimics of macromolecular function.

Miles A. Fabian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: fabianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Design and Synthesis of Chemical Probes

Design, synthesis, and testing of novel small molecule probes that target specific biological pathways, potentially as new therapeutics. Includes computational docking studies.

Miles A. Fabian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: fabianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Enzyme Mechanisms, Regulation, and Inhibition

Individual enzyme mechanisms, regulation, modification, and inhibition to understand the catalytic specificity of synthesis, modification, or degradation of metabolites and macromolecules.

Oleg Barski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Enzymology of Nucleic Acid Modifiers

Mechanisms of enzyme complexes that interact with DNA and RNA; focused on catalysis and sequence recognition, topology, and transformation of nucleic acids. (Genome-specific processes of recombination, replication, transcription, are assigned to GMCDB.)

Oleg Barski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Glycosciences

Carbohydrate-containing macromolecules where emphasis is on the carbohydrate and their binding partner(s). Includes sugar transporters and carrier lipids, glycan processing enzymes, protein:glycan mediated interactions, and peptidoglycans.

Pamela Marino, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: marinop@nigms.nih.gov

Metallobiology

Functions of metalloenzymes (containing Cu, Ni, Zn, Fe, Se), and design and characterization of bioinorganic catalysts and biomimetic complexes.

Vernon Anderson, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: andersonve@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Natural Products Discovery and Biosynthesis

Biosynthetic pathways for natural products, including isolation and structure of natural products. Study of microbial communities and interactions with the host, such as the microbiome.

Miles A. Fabian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: fabianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Pathways of Intermediary Metabolism and Catalysis

Metabolic pathways and information flow; includes studies of transient intermediates and stable multi-enzyme complexes, and how catalytic processes and fluxes are affected by the intracellular milieu.

Oleg Barski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Redox Reactions and Oxidative Stress

Pathways responsible for generation or decomposition of reactive species (O, N, S), and the modification of cellular constituents by oxidative stressors; chemistry and maintenance of cellular redox balance.

Vernon Anderson, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: andersonve@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

SBIRs/STTRs in BBC Branch

Small business (SBIR) and tech transfer (STTR) grants in Biochesmitry and Bio-related Chemistry.

Pamela Marino, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: marinop@nigms.nih.gov

Synthetic Organic Methods

Synthetic methodology development, including physical organic, mechanistic, and bioorthogonal chemistry.

Robert Lees, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: leesro@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Total Organic Synthesis

Total synthesis of complex organic molecules.

Robert Lees, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: leesro@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Trace Metal Transport and Homeostasis

Regulation of metal ions (Cu, Ni, Zn, Fe, Se), their transport and intracellular concentrations, metal ion chaperones, and metal ion ionophores; restriction of metal ion availability as a therapeutic intervention.

Vernon Anderson, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: andersonve@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch


Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences

Adaptive Immune Cell Mechanisms

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune cell (T cells, B cells) functions in the adaptive immune response.

Pamela Marino, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: marinop@nigms.nih.gov

Anesthesia and Pain

Mechanisms and systemic effects of anesthesia including general, regional, and local anesthetics. Includes sedation in the intensive care setting, pain control and studies of consciousness related to anesthesia and the peri-operative period.

Alison E. Cole, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: colea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Calcium Signaling and Compartmentalization

Temporal and spatial signaling within cells, including calcium fluxes, diffusion, and pumps; regulation of signaling molecules by compartmentalization within organelles, and cellular sinks and releasing proteins.

Zhongzhen Nie, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: niezhong@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Cell Surface Receptors, Ligands, and Interactions

G protein-coupled receptors and cell surface receptors for drugs, endogenous ligands, and other stimuli; purpose is to understand basic biology and/or for validation as potential therapeutic targets.

Sailaja Koduri, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: sailaja.koduri@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Drug Metabolism, Transport, and Kinetics

Drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, including drug-drug and nutrient interactions, toxicity and adverse effects. Includes pharmacokinetics, dynamics and genetics.

Richard T. Okita, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: okitar@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Inflammation and Innate Immunity

Cellular and molecular mediators of onset, regulation, and termination of inflammation and the innate immune response. Includes bioactive lipid mediators in inflammatory disorders.

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Intracellular Mediators of Signal Transduction

Molecular pathways for signal transduction and regulation within cells, including second messengers such as kinases, phosphatases, adapter proteins, lipid messengers, phospholipases and others (excluding calcium). Includes intracellular nuclear and cytosolic receptors.

Sarah E. Dunsmore, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: dunsmores@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Membrane Channels

Pore-forming proteins specialized for ions (Na, K, Cl), ligand and voltage-gated, found at cell surface and organelle membranes. Includes ion channel blockers such as venoms and toxins.

Zhongzhen Nie, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: niezhong@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Membrane Components and Cell-to-Cell Communications

Scaffolding and functional components of cellular membranes and vesicles: structural lipids (e.g., cholesterol), integral proteins, and their modifications. Gap junctions and communications between cells.

Zhongzhen Nie, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: niezhong@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Multi-organ Physiology

Systemic biological responses to challenges spanning multiple organ systems, including the physiological consequences of circadian rhythms, nutritional requirements, and stress.

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Packaging and Delivery of Molecules and Biologics

Delivery systems for small and large molecules and biologics, including liposomes, dendrimers, viruses, chemical cages, and platforms/devices, with an emphasis on drug release and kinetics.

Richard T. Okita, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: okitar@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

SBIRs/STTRs in PPS Branch

Small business (SBIR) and tech transfer (STTR) grants in Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences.

Alison E. Cole, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: colea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Sepsis and Septic Shock

Severe sepsis and septic shock, with emphasis on the host's response rather than a presumptive causative microorganism or injury.

Sarah E. Dunsmore, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: dunsmores@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Trauma and Burn Injury

Responses to injury (traumatic, thermal, or surgical) and shock, in post-injury period to acute phase through long-term effects, until recovery or mortality. Includes inflammatory and immune responses, hypermetabolism, and prediction of body-wide recovery.

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Wound Healing

Processes underlying wound healing, tissue repair, and regeneration.

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Research Capacity Building

IDeA Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE)

The goal of COBRE is to strengthen institutional biomedical research capabilities in IDeA-eligible states. COBRE supports three phases of infrastructure and faculty development in thematic, multidisciplinary centers.

COBRE Phase I

COBRE Phase I focus on the development of requisite research resources and infrastructure, and the provision of formal research mentoring and research project funding to junior investigators to facilitate their acquisition of preliminary data and successful competition for independent research grant support.

Yanping Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: liuyanp@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

COBRE Phase II

COBRE Phase II is intended to further strengthen existing COBRE centers through the support and enhancement of the growing research infrastructure and continuing the development and expansion of a critical mass of investigators with shared scientific interests.

Yanping Liu, M.D., Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: liuyanp@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

COBRE Phase III

COBRE Phase III primarily provides support for scientific and technical cores to become independent service research facilities in the institution, and to sustain the research environment developed in the first two phases.

J. Rafael Gorospé, M.D., Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: gorospejr@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Science Education Partnership Awards (SEPA)

Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) program supports educational activities, including interactive digital media resources, that complement or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs.

Tony Beck, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-435-0805
E-mail: beckl@mail.nih.gov

IDeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE)

INBRE's goal is to enhance, extend and strengthen the research capabilities of biomedical and behavioral research faculty in IDeA states. The strategy is to build statewide, multidisciplinary research networks that expand the research opportunities and increase the number of competitive investigators in those states. INBRE supports institutional research and infrastructure development; research by faculty, postdoctoral scientists and students at participating institutions; and outreach to build science and technology knowledge in the states' workforces.

Krishan Arora, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: arorak@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

IDeA Infrastructure for Clinical and Translational Research (IDeA-CTR)

IDeA-CTR encourages consortium applications from IDeA states to develop network infrastructure and capacity to conduct clinical and translational research focused on health concerns that affect medically underserved populations and/or that are prevalent in IDeA states. IDeA-CTR awards support mentoring and career development activities in clinical and translational research and facilitate collaboration among clinical researchers in IDeA and non-IDeA states.

J. Rafael Gorospé, M.D., Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: gorospejr@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Native American Research Centers for Health (NARCH)

This initiative provides support for partnerships of American Indian or Alaska Native tribes or tribal-based organizations with institutions that conduct intensive, academic-level biomedical research. The intent is to develop opportunities for conducting research and research training responsive to the needs of Native American communities.

Sheila A. Caldwell, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: caldwells@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

SCORE Pilot Project Award

This award supports new investigators at institutions that have a historical mission focused on serving students from population groups underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce who wish to establish a line of research within the NIH mission but need preliminary data. Investigators who have received SCORE support previously may only apply for a SCORE pilot project award if they seek to change research fields and need preliminary data. The award is nonrenewable.

Hinda Zlotnik, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: zlotnikh@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

SCORE Research Advancement Award

This mechanism supports investigators at institutions that have a historical mission focused on serving students from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce who seek to increase their research competitiveness in biomedical research fields, with the ultimate goal of making the transition to major non-SCORE support. This award may be renewed once.

Hinda Zlotnik, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: zlotnikh@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

SCORE Research Continuance Award

This mechanism supports investigators at institutions that have a historical mission focused on serving students from population groups underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce who still aim to improve their research competitiveness within an environment and circumstances that may require them to work at a less-intense pace than with a SCORE Research Advancement Award mechanism. The proposed projects must be of limited scope in a given biomedical field within the NIH mission. This award is renewable.

Hinda Zlotnik, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: zlotnikh@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity

Undergraduate and Predoctoral Training

Bridges to the Baccalaureate (R25)

This initiative provides institutional support to partnerships between community colleges and colleges or universities that offer the baccalaureate degree to develop well-integrated developmental activities that will increase students preparation and skills as they advance academically in the pursuit and successful completion of the baccalaureate degree in biomedical sciences.

Mercedes Rubio, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: rubiome@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Patrick Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: patrick.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Bridges to the Doctorate (R25)

This initiative provides institutional support to partnerships between institutions granting a terminal master’s degree and institutions that offer Ph.D. degrees to develop well-integrated developmental activities that will increase students’ preparation and skills as they advance academically in the pursuit and successful completion of the Ph.D. degree in biomedical sciences.

Patrick Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: patrick.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce: Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) (U54)

BUILD is a set of experimental training awards designed to implement and study innovative and effective approaches to engaging and retaining students from diverse backgrounds in biomedical research and preparing students to become future contributors to the NIH-funded research enterprise. BUILD is a part of the NIH Common Fund consortium Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce. Consortium contact: Alison Gammie.

Anissa J. Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: anissa.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Richard Okita, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: okitar@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Desirée Salazar, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: desiree.salazar@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) (R25)

Awards are for institutional programs that seek to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups in biomedical research who enter into and successfully complete Ph.D. degree programs in these fields. These awards are for institutions with a fully developed research infrastructure and full-time matriculated students from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce. Support is limited to student development and training.

Veerasamy Ravichandran, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-9822
E-mail: ravichanr@nigms.nih.gov ravichanr@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Sailaja Koduri, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: sailaja.koduri@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP) (R25)

This initiative provides institutional support for the research training and education of recent baccalaureate graduates from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce, who plan to pursue Ph.D. degrees. This research apprenticeship serves as an educational transition for recent baccalaureate graduates who will acquire essential academic credentials and research skills to make them more competitive for Ph.D. programs at highly selective institutions.

Kenneth Gibbs, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3901
E-mail: kenneth.gibbs@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Luis Cubano, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: luis.cubano@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) (R25)

This initiative provides support to institutions with significant enrollment of students from populations groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical sciences to implement a set of well-integrated developmental activities designed to strengthen students’ academic preparation, research training and professional skills critical for completion of the Ph.D. degree in the in biomedical sciences.

Luis Cubano, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: luis.cubano@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Anissa J. Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: anissa.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Science Awards (NRSA) Institutional Research Training Grants (T32) - Predoctoral

All requests for general information about training grants should be directed to:
Shiva Singh, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: singhs@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

NIGMS staff members who manage specific training programs are listed below.

Behavioral-Biomedical Science Interface

Programs should provide graduate research training for students at the behavioral sciences-biomedical sciences interface. The goal of the program is to develop basic behavioral scientists with rigorous broad-based training in the biomedical sciences who are available to assume leadership roles related to the Nation’s biomedical research needs. These programs must provide an interdisciplinary research training experience and curriculum for predoctoral trainees that integrates both behavioral and biomedical perspectives, approaches and methodologies. Programs must include coursework, laboratory rotations and programmatic activities that reinforce training at this interface. Significant participation by faculty and leadership from both behavioral and biomedical science departments is required, as is co-mentoring of trainees by faculty from both components.

Mercedes Rubio, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: rubiome@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Programs should train students in the background theory and biological application of information sciences (including computer science, statistics and mathematics) to problems relevant to biomedical research. Of particular interest are multiscale and large-scale problems in biology. Training should include the use of theory and computer application to the full spectrum of basic research in the biomedical sciences, including the analysis of molecular sequence and structure, molecular function, cellular function, physiology, genomics and genetics.

Veerasamy Ravichandran, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-9822
E-mail: ravichanr@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Hulak Resat, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-827-6671
E-mail: haluk.resat@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biostatistics

Provides support for predoctoral training that integrates biostatistical theory and evolving methodologies with basic biomedical research including, but not limited to, bioinformatics, genetics, molecular biology, cellular processes and physiology, as well as epidemiological and clinical studies. The goal is to ensure that a workforce of biostatisticians with a deep understanding of statistical theory and new methodologies is available to assume leadership roles related to the Nation’s biomedical research needs.

Kenneth Gibbs, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3901
E-mail: kenneth.gibbs@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biotechnology

This training program supports the education of graduate students in the techniques and principles needed to pursue research in biotechnology. The education should be multidisciplinary, but provide a firm grounding in one or more of the fields that contribute to biotechnology, such as engineering, biophysics, biochemistry, genetics and cell biology. Faculty trainers and students participating in this program should be drawn from several departments but with a focus on engineering. The trainers should be conducting research relevant to the understanding and utilization of biological processes for biotechnological applications. These programs are expected to provide holistic training that should include, besides scientific theoretical and practical knowledge, communications skills, career development, and an understanding of regulatory, commercialization and IP issues in bringing a biotechnology product to the market. The program requires a mandatory 3 month internship in pharmaceutical or biotechnological industry. A close interaction between academic and industrial partners is strongly recommended.

Patrick Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: patrick.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Cellular, Biochemical and Molecular Sciences

Programs should be of cross-disciplinary nature and involve in-depth study of biological problems at the level of the cellular and molecular sciences. The research training offered should encompass related disciplines, such as biochemistry, biophysics, chemistry, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, neurobiology and pathology.

Desirée Salazar, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: desiree.salazar@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Amanda Melillo, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: amanda.melillo@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Chemistry-Biology Interface

Training programs in this area should provide significant biological training to students receiving in-depth training in a chemical discipline and provide significant training in chemistry to students being trained in depth in the biological sciences. CBI programs should have a focus on the use of synthetic and mechanistic chemistry as approaches to studying biological problems. Programs will consist primarily of faculty drawn from departments of chemistry, medicinal chemistry and/or pharmaceutical chemistry and faculty from the biological disciplines, such as biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology. Students trained at the chemistry-biology interface should be well-grounded in a core discipline and sufficiently well-trained in complementary fields to allow them to work effectively in a multidisciplinary team.

Miles A. Fabian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: fabianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Genetics

Programs should emphasize broad training in the principles and mechanisms of genetics and related sciences. Training in a variety of areas such as classical genetics, molecular genetics, population genetics, and developmental genetics should be included. Programs should also include training and research opportunities in related disciplines such as biochemistry, cell biology and statistics.

Michael Bender, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: mbender@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP)

The Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) supports the training of students who are motivated to undertake a career in biomedical research and academic medicine in an integrated program of scientific and medical study leading to the combined M.D.-Ph.D. degree. The program's goal is to prepare its graduates to function independently in both basic research and clinical investigations.

Stefan Maas, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: maassw@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Joe Gindhart, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: gindhartjg@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Molecular Biophysics

Training in this area should be multidisciplinary and focus on the application of physics, mathematics and chemistry to the problems of biological structure, primarily at the molecular level. These programs should bring together faculty from departments such as chemistry, physics and engineering who have an interest in biologically related research with faculty in biological science departments whose orientation is the application of physical methods and concepts to biological systems.

Paula Flicker, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: flickerp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Molecular Medicine

Training in molecular medicine is intended to combine rigorous didactic training in the basic biomedical sciences with exposure to concepts and knowledge underlying the molecular basis of disease. In addition to training in the core concepts of molecular biology, cell biology and biochemistry, trainees in molecular medicine should have specialized required courses such as pathophysiology and molecular pathogenesis, and program activities, such as seminar series or journal clubs, that provide students with a better understanding of disease mechanisms. Examples of other features that would enhance training in molecular medicine could include dual mentors in basic and clinical science, and exposure to the concepts of medicine through participation in grand rounds. As with all NIGMS training programs, training faculty should be broadly drawn from multiple departments and disciplines and thesis research topics should similarly reflect a broad range of interdisciplinary opportunities in the basic biomedical sciences. The goal is to train a cadre of scientists prepared to work at the interface of basic biomedical science and clinical research, an area sometimes referred to as translational research. This training opportunity should be primarily designed for Ph.D. candidates; M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. doctoral candidates may be interested in such a program and could participate, but should not be the ones for whom a training program in molecular medicine is designed and should not be appointed as trainees to the training grant. A training program in Molecular Medicine should attract a new and distinct pool of students, and the training should clearly be differentiated from that offered by other training programs at the Institution.

Alison E. Cole, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: colea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Pharmacological Sciences

Training programs in this area should be multidisciplinary and emphasize the acquisition of competence in the broad field of pharmacological sciences. Individuals should receive training that will enable them to conduct research on the biological phenomena and related chemical and molecular processes involved in the actions of therapeutic drugs and their metabolites. Thesis research opportunities should be available with faculty members in a variety of disciplines, such as biochemistry, chemistry, genetics, toxicology, medicinal chemistry, physiology and neurosciences, as well as pharmacology.

Sailaja Koduri, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: sailaja.koduri@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Systems and Integrative Biology

Training in this area should be directed toward building the broad research competence required to investigate integrative, regulatory and developmental processes of higher organisms and their functional components. The training program should bring together varied resources, approaches and thesis research opportunities with faculty mentors of such disciplines/departments as physiology, biomedical engineering, the neurosciences, biochemistry and cell and developmental biology. Graduates of the program should be well-versed in quantitative, integrative and systems approaches to biology.

Zhongzhen Nie, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0828
E-mail: niezhong@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Transdisciplinary Basic Biomedical Sciences

This area is designed to increase efficiencies, and broaden the scope and geographic distribution of NIGMS training dollars. It is open only to: a) institutions that currently do not have a NIGMS-funded institutional predoctoral T32 training program in any of the basic biomedical sciences disciplines listed above (with the exception of Behavioral-Biomedical Sciences Interface or Biostatistics), or b) institutions with current NIGMS-funded predoctoral T32 training programs that propose to merge two or more of their existing NIGMS-funded predoctoral training programs in to a single program. Training supported under this area may be covered by the other NIGMS-supported areas of basic biomedical sciences disciplines, or may include other emerging area(s) within the NIGMS mission.

Shiva Singh, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: singhs@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowships (F30 and F31)

Awards are for individuals who seek advanced predoctoral research training in basic biomedical sciences relevant to the NIGMS mission. These fellowships promote fundamental, interdisciplinary and innovative research training and career development leading to independent scientists who are well prepared to address the nation's biomedical research needs.

All requests for general information about training grants should be directed to:
Tel:  
E-mail:  

Shiva Singh, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: singhs@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Predoctoral M.D./Ph.D. or Other Dual-Doctoral Degree Fellowships (F30)

These awards are designed to enhance the integrated research and clinical training of promising predoctoral students, who are matriculated in a combined M.D.-Ph.D. or other dual-doctoral degree training program (e.g. D.O.-Ph.D., D.D.S.-Ph.D., Au.D.-Ph.D., D.V.M.-Ph.D), and who intend careers as physician-scientists or other clinician-scientists. The fellowship experience is expected to clearly enhance the individuals’ potential to develop into productive, independent physician-scientists or other clinician-scientists.

Kenneth Gibbs, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3901
E-mail: kenneth.gibbs@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Predoctoral Fellowships to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (F31)

This NIH-wide program funds predoctoral fellowships for students (enrolled in Ph.D. or combined degree program) from population groups that have been shown to be underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce, preparing them to enter research careers in biomedical sciences.

Patrick Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: patrick.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Anissa J. Brown, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: anissa.brown@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Postdoctoral Training

Career Development Awards

Clinical Career Development Awards (K08/K23)

These awards support the development of outstanding academic physician-scientists in the areas of anesthesiology, clinical pharmacology, innate immunity, inflammation, sepsis, and trauma and burn injury. They provide support for a period of 3 to 5 years of supervised research and study to clinically trained professionals who have the commitment and potential to develop into productive, independent investigators.

Anesthesiology

Alison E. Cole, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: colea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Clinical Pharmacology

Rochelle M. Long, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: longr@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Innate Immunity and Inflammation

Sarah E. Dunsmore, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: dunsmores@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Sepsis

Sarah E. Dunsmore, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: dunsmores@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Trauma and Burn Injury Research

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Mentored Quantitative Research Career Awards (K25)

These awards support the career development of quantitatively trained investigators from the postdoctoral level to the senior faculty level who make a commitment to basic or clinical biomedicine, bioengineering or bioimaging research that is relevant to the NIH mission.

Michael A. Sesma
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Pathway to Independence Awards (K99/R00)

This program provides support for both mentored and independent research from the same award. The award provides up to 5 years of support consisting of two phases: the initial phase (K99) provides 1-2 years of mentored support to highly promising, postdoctoral research scientists, followed by up to 3 years of independent support (R00) contingent on the scientist securing an independent research position. Applications are accepted for research and training aligned with the NIGMS research priorities. NIGMS encourages postdoctoral trainees to apply by their third year of postdoctoral training.

Requests for general information about individual postdoctoral fellowships should be directed to:
Michael Sesma, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-2722
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

For information specific to the training program areas listed below, contact the indicated staff member.

Dan Janes, Ph.D., Division of Genetics and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: janesde@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Paula Flicker, Ph.D., Biophysics, Biomedical Technology and Computational Biosciences
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: flickerp@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Oleg Barski, Ph.D., Division of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Michael Sesma, Ph.D., Division of Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce: National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) (U54)

NRMN is developing a national network of motivated and skilled mentors from various disciplines linked to mentees across the country–both from BUILD institutions and elsewhere–for individuals at the undergraduate to early career faculty levels and spanning biomedical disciplines relevant to the NIH mission. It is also developing best practices and training opportunities for mentors, as well as networking and professional development opportunities for mentees. NRMN is a part of the NIH Common Fund consortium Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce. Consortium contact: Alison Gammie.

Mercedes Rubio, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: rubiome@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce: Coordination and Evaluation Center (CEC) (U54)

The CEC coordinates activities and will evaluate the efficacy of the training and mentoring approaches developed by BUILD and NRMN awardees. These findings will have implications for recruiting, training and mentoring of diverse groups nationwide, and the CEC will disseminate effective approaches to the broader research and mentoring communities. CEC is a part of the NIH Common Fund consortium Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce. Consortium contact: Alison Gammie.

Michael Sesma, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-2772
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Individual Postdoctoral Fellowships (F32) and Senior Fellowships (F33)

The F32 fellowship is for individuals who seek postdoctoral research training in areas related to the scientific programs of the institute. The senior fellowships (F33) are for established independent investigators.

Requests for general information about individual postdoctoral fellowships should be directed to:
Michael Sesma, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-2772
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

For postdoctoral fellowship information specific to the program areas listed below, contact the indicated staff member:

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Veerasamy Ravichandran, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-9822
E-mail: ravichanr@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Biotechnology

Assigned to all postdoctoral areas/disciplines

Genetics and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

For inquiries prior to application submission please contact Dr. Sesma
Applications will be assigned to program officers by the last digit of the Application Grant Number, e.g., 1 F32 GM32100X

For Applications ending in 0-2, Dr. Willis
For Applications ending in 3-5, Dr. Maas
For Applications ending in 6-7, Dr. Hoodbhoy
For Applications ending in 8-9, Dr. Melillo

Amanda Melillo, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: amanda.melillo@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Stefan Maas, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: maassw@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Kristine Willis, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: kristine.willis@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Molecular Biophysics

Michael Sakalian, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-451-6446
E-mail: sakalianm@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Pharmacological Sciences, Anesthesiology and Clinical Pharmacology

Oleg Barski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Physiology

Oleg Barski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Robert Lees, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: leesro@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Quantitative Biology

Assigned to all postdoctoral areas/disciplines

Oleg Barski, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: oleg.barski@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award (IRACDA)

These awards provide institutional support to partnerships between a research-intensive university and one or more partner institutions that have a historical mission and a demonstrated commitment to providing training, encouragement and assistance to students from population groups underrepresented in the biomedical research workforce. The grant supports postdoctoral trainees who are engaged in cutting-edge research at the research-intensive university and who also participate in teaching at a partner institution, thus helping improve the research environment and also providing diversity in courses available to students at these institutions.

Desirée Salazar, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: desiree.salazar@nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Mercedes Rubio, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: rubiome@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Innovative Programs to Enhance Research Training (IPERT)

The IPERT supports creative and innovative research educational activities designed to complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nation’s biomedical research needs. Each IPERT program must address the NIGMS goals of creating a highly skilled and diverse biomedical workforce. The programs can be designed to support stages of research career development from the undergraduate to the faculty level and must be ancillary or complementary to those research training and research education programs in which they currently participate, regardless of the source of support. While the balance of activities in a single application may vary, an IPERT application must effectively integrate three core elements: short-courses/workshops for skills development; mentoring; and outreach. This opportunity may be appropriate for research conferences, program-related workshops and activities, and educational projects previously supported by the expired MARC Ancillary Training Activities (T36) FOA.

Michael Sesma, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-2772
E-mail: msesma@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Mercedes Rubio, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: rubiome@mail.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) Institutional Research Training Grant (T32) - Postdoctoral

Requests for general information about institutional postdoctoral fellowships should be directed to:
Alison E. Cole, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: colea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

NIGMS staff members who manage specific training programs are listed below.

Anesthesiology

Programs should provide multidisciplinary research training to help develop individuals with the skills and expertise to explore problems relevant to anesthesiology, including the fundamental mechanisms of anesthetic action. The goal is to provide rigorous postdoctoral research training with an emphasis on hypothesis-driven laboratory or clinical research. Trainees, most of whom would hold the M.D. degree, will be expected to spend at least 2 years in the training program and should have the opportunity to acquire fundamental knowledge and research techniques in such disciplines as biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, molecular biology, neurobiology, pharmacology or physiology. For trainees with the Ph.D. degree, the research and training should be specifically designed to promote a research career addressing problems in anesthesiology.

Alison E. Cole, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: colea@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Clinical Pharmacology

Individuals in these training programs should receive experience in the methodology and in the conduct of clinical and basic research to qualify them to investigate the effects and mechanisms of drug actions in humans. Trainees, who would usually have the M.D. degree, should have the opportunity to acquire fundamental scientific knowledge and learn research techniques in areas such as basic pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, biostatistics and other biomedical subdisciplines.

Richard T. Okita, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: okitar@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Medical Genetics

Training programs should provide advances and specialized research training in the principles of genetics with the goal of understanding human genetic disorders. Trainees should be drawn from diverse backgrounds and should be offered opportunities for conducting research with faculty who represent a variety of approaches to genetics ranging from molecular genetics to human population genetics. For holders of the M.D. or other professional degrees, the program should provide training and research opportunities in areas of basic genetics. This training should build on, and complement, the trainee's clinical background. For holders of the Ph.D. degree, the research and training should emphasize the application of the trainee's basic genetics background to problems in human and medical genetics.

Michael Bender, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-0943
E-mail: mbender@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Trauma, Burn, and Peri-Operative Injury

Support for multidisciplinary research training is offered to individuals holding the M.D. or Ph.D. degree who seek to improve the understanding of the body's systemic responses to major injury and to foster the more rapid application of this knowledge to the treatment of trauma and burn-injured victims and/or critically ill patients. The supervisory staff of the training program should include trauma surgeons, burn specialists and critical care specialists as well as basic scientists. Trainees, most of whom would hold the M.D. degree, will be expected to spend at least 2 years in the training program and to apply such basic disciplines as physiology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, cell biology, molecular biology, biomedical engineering or behavioral sciences to the study of injury and/or critical illness.

Scott D. Somers, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3827
E-mail: somerss@nigms.nih.gov
Biographical sketch

Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research and Supplements to Promote Reentry into Biomedical and Behavioral Research Careers

This NIH-wide program provides supplemental funds to principal investigators holding NIGMS research grants, to improve the diversity of the research workforce by supporting and recruiting students and postdoctoral fellows from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities and individuals from economically or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds that have inhibited their ability to pursue a career in health-related research.

Desirée Salazar, Ph.D.
Tel: 301-594-3900
E-mail: desiree.salazar@nih.gov
Biographical sketch



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This page last reviewed on January 31, 2018